Jamu ginger and tumeric
Jamu: The Royal Nectar & How to Make It
August 8, 2022
by Ngaio Richards
Jamu ginger and tumeric
Jamu: The Royal Nectar & How to Make It
August 8, 2022
by Ngaio Richards

 

Recently I found myself with an overabundance of fresh organically grown turmeric and ginger. Farmlife has the tendency to do this. Suddenly it’s harvest time and you are forced to stop doing whatever you were doing to fully embrace nature’s opulence. My cunning plan had worked, this was my biggest harvest yet!

What to do with it all? That was a good question and the answer came with astounding speed and multi-sensory memories.

I am in Ubud, simmering heat rising, bamboo chimes clacking, roosters crowing in the distance, I am curled upon a colourful silk cushion absorbing the languid atmosphere. My nostrils besieged by pungent aromas, I am tentatively sipping a phenomenally intense golden liqueur. All this before breakfast. At the time I was never quite sure if I actually liked Jamu or if I mainly drank it because I knew it was good for me. It was an ambivalent relationship but one my memory cells never forgot.

I didn’t know then that Jamu originated in Java more than 1,000 years ago, nor that the drink was used to keep royal women healthy and beautiful after bearing children (SBS).

So back to the present day, I figured ‘what the hell’, lets try it again. Thank you Google – thank you, thank you. Upon revisiting it I’ve decided I love Jamu and my body can’t get enough of it either.

 

So what’s in Jamu?

 

The two main, easy to access ingredients are both also frequently used in Chinese herbal medicine so we have a nice crossover going on here.

Fresh Ginger (‘Sheng jiang’ in Chinese herbalism), is a major detoxifier along with its other very broad range of effects. Sheng jiang is warming especially to the spleen/stomach which as you may know from your treatments are considered to be the central digestive organs. So it supports gut health. The medicinal effects also extend to the lungs.

Turmeric (‘Jiang huang’) is viewed through the lens of Chinese herbalism amongst other things as a regulator of the blood so can be used in preparations to balance menstruation. Interestingly we do use it to treat pain but primarily pain of the shoulders/arms. Jiang huang is also warming especially to the spleen/stomach.

Just a couple of things: if you decide to make Jamu yourself, if you are using organically grown Ginger & Turmeric there is no need to peel it. Just make sure the roots are well cleaned. The skins have their own medicinal effects and contribute toward making a more complete medicine.

You can find these roots and also fresh lime at your local farmers market or food coop. Shopping at these places is helping to create a local food system, supports the growers + you get to start developing more direct relationships with the people who provide your food. That’s win win win.

 

Jamu Recipe

 

PREP TIME 15mins
COOK TIME 15mins
TOTAL TIME 30mins
SERVINGS 4-6

Ingredients

1cup fresh turmeric, cleaned & chopped
½ cup fresh ginger, cleaned & chopped
4 cups water
½ cup honey
¼ cup fresh squeezed lime juice (1-3 limes)

Method

  1. Blend the turmeric and ginger: Into a blender add the turmeric, ginger and water. Blend until smooth. Pour the mixture into a medium saucepan set over medium high heat and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for about 15 minutes.
  2. Add honey: Remove the saucepan from the heat, add the honey. Stir to combine.
  3. Strain and refrigerate: Strain the mixture through a fine mesh sieve. Then pour the strained mixture into a glass bottle and refrigerate.
  4. Serve: You can enjoy this drink warm or room temp. Add lime juice to taste just before serving. You might like to add additional still or sparkling water.

Note: Remember that Vitamin C is temperature sensitive, so best to add the lime juice after the cooking process.
Also you might prefer to wear gloves when handling the turmeric (LOL)!

 

“Homicide is 0.8% of deaths.
Diet related disease is over 60%.
But no one fu*%king talks about it.”

Apparently said by Jamie Oliver

 

 

Book an Appointment with Ngaio Richards

Ngaio is available by appointment every 4th week from Wednesday to Friday. You can book via our online booking system.

 

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We offer acupuncture treatments & Chinese herbal medicine with a clinical focus on pregnancy & a range of women’s health issues.

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We offer acupuncture treatments & Chinese herbal medicine with a clinical focus on pregnancy & a range of women’s health issues.

Come & See Us

We offer acupuncture treatments & Chinese herbal medicine with a clinical focus on pregnancy & a range of women’s health issues.

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House of Fertility & Healing, 35D New Canterbury Rd, Petersham, Sydney 2049. By Appointment Only.

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Visit Us

House of Fertility & Healing 35D New Canterbury Rd, Petersham, Sydney 2049

By Appointment Only.

Call Us

Visit Us

House of Fertility & Healing, 35D New Canterbury Rd, Petersham, Sydney 2049.

By Appointment Only.

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